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Leaf Picks

Maine

GMO Cookies (AKA Garlic Mushroom and Onion Cookies)

from Melting Pot Farm

"The flower engulfs itself and smokes through evenly, never needing to be re-lit."

GMO Cookies (AKA Garlic Mushroom and Onion Cookies) is an offensive smelling cross of Chemdog and Girl Scout Cookies. The new school line up of berry/citrus heavy Cannabis strains were calling for some funk, and the GMO answered with a stank you can smell from across the room.

Melting Pot Farm grows this GMO in a majority water-only coco blend with some top dressing and occasional Biobizz feeding. The skill level combined with the mix takes this cultivar to the next level, which is cured to perfection and boasts a very thick, full-bodied smoke. The trichomes are heavily packed and the buds feature a series of dark green and violet bulbous puzzle pieces that break apart in elegant fashion. 

When lit, the flower engulfs itself and smokes through evenly, never needing to be re-lit. Unless of course the user needs a break, which is very possible – Melting Pot’s GMO is a hitter.

After one bowl, I settled in for a second to reach the GMO’s true potential. As the second bowl burned, I noticed an unmarked white van with blacked out windows in my driveway, leaving me to stare at the driver side window for what seemed like five minutes. Is this it? Is this the end of the line? Then a dude hops out with a delivery and goes on his way. I had gone straight to DEFCON 5 and then thought to myself, “This GMO is good!” 

I got past the paranoia and switched to a subpar Hulu original comedy that I paused after a few minutes, leaving me to sit in deep and silent thought for about an hour. This strain is not for beginners. 

GMO brings a very onion garlic smell, lots of funk from the Chem, and heavy aromatics of spice coming from the Durban Poison side of the Girl Scout Cookies. Brings me back to the days of 90’s road kill skunk and not being able to enter a room without everyone knowing you’ve got that bag.

This article was originally published in the September 2020 issue of Northeast Leaf.

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