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DANIEL BERMAN

Leaf Picks

Oregon

True Glue

Tao Bubble’s True Glue 90/120µ tops out at 11.26% terpenes.

A few years ago, Tao Gardens made its debut in Eugene with a focus on no-till, holistic, living-soil flowers. Since then, they’ve pumped out a collection of profiles for connoisseurs craving robust terpene content and a smooth smoke.  

Today, they’ve expanded into the realm of concentrates with two separate lines of hash and rosin products. Holistic Hash (the latest brand extension) aims to provide “quality yet cost-effective solventless offerings.” But for this month’s concentrate highlight, we’ll be diving into something from their top-tiered line: Tao Bubble.

True Glue (also known as GG#4) is a GG Strains genetic touting Sour Dubb, Chem Sis, and Chocolate Diesel lineages. The team at Tao Gardens has been highlighting this powerful, pungent strain’s traits in flower form for some time now. But their newest release of the True Glue Full Melt (90/120µ) is a welcomed addition to the lineup. 

A peek into the jar provides a soft, nearly white sand and an earthy, umami bouquet. According to the test results, this can be attributed to the product’s high β-caryophyllene, β-farnesene, and limonene content. In total, Tao Bubble’s True Glue 90/120µ tops out at 11.26% terpenes.

Handling this product requires some prep and care. But a quick finger press in some parchment unlocks a shiny sheet of milky, mashed heads and a pleasant consistency for dabbing. And these dabs most definitely unlock a more complex flavor than the nose provides. The exhale is still True to the Glue, but there’s also a teriyaki-like, subtly sweet, and savory note. 

The experience is warm and relaxing, but allows for room to decide which direction it’ll take you. A sedated slumber is easy to attain under this strain, and this dab will serve you solidly with heavy cerebral hits. If you can avoid the comfort of your couch long enough, you may reap the benefits of its euphoric side effects.

This article was originally published in the September 2021 issue of Oregon Leaf.

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