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Washington

Goodies Hard Candies

from Goodies

A big variety in flavors that are all equally tasty and artfully developed

When it comes to hard candies it’s all about flavor, and these delicious little squares are bursting with fruity juice that melts on the palate in sublingual perfection.

Most hard candies remind us of the crappy treats that smelly old people had in purses as a child, which was never a pleasant experience. So imagine our surprise at the bounty of sweetness found in the Goodies Hard Candies, featuring delicious flavors including green apple, wild strawberry, blue raspberry and mango. Each one is mouthwateringly yummy, with their own unique vibe that comes with a consistent buzz.

The mango and strawberry flavors taste exactly like fresh fruit, while the green apple is delightfully tart without being too sour, and the blue raspberry tastes like a trip back to a ‘90s sugar high. All equally vibrant, the candies are hard squares easily broken into two 5mg pieces for microdosing, and they melt or crunch easily with a mild Cannabis flavor that complements the sweetness, and lets you know that this candy comes packing more than just sugar. We found it really hard to eat just one serving but also experienced long-lasting effects that were satisfying and consistently stoney.

Made from the same company that brought Dama premium flower to 502, we expect to see these Goodies at stores around the state, along with their new line of buttery caramels. We loved the soft texture of the french vanilla bean chewy caramel, which was sweet and sultry with a deep vanilla kiss, and the hard candy style brown butter caramel, which offers a rich brown sugar caramel that can be crunched or sucked.

With a big variety in flavors that are all equally tasty and artfully developed, Goodies has taken the simple hard candy category and turned it into a gourmet flavor experience. With sweet, sour, or savory options, the only thing limiting a heady buzz is having to pick which flavor to enjoy.

This article was originally published in the June 2021 issue of Northwest Leaf.

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