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DANIEL BERMAN

Leaf Picks

Oregon

Tangerine Relief Gel+

from Hatshe

The gel is a gorgeous apricot color and has a wet and almost liquid consistency.

In a sea of CBD/THC salves, lotions, and creams, it can be mind-boggling trying to find a product that suits you best and ultimately brings you the relief you are looking for. As always, our team has done the heavy lifting, bringing you September’s Topical of the Month: Hatshe’s Tangerine Relief Gel+! 

This vegan and 85% certified organic gel smells incredible, as the tangerine essential oil, chamomile flower oil, and camphor penetrate your nostrils with the most pleasurable of scents. Each four-ounce jar comes in an elegant and simplistic white box. The gel is a gorgeous apricot color and has a wet and almost liquid consistency. Unlike other products, Hatshe’s Relief Gel+ is quick-drying, leaving your skin feeling dream-like – not greasy whatsoever.

As someone who frequently exercises and puts their body through the wringer, I can say from experience that this gel can help with an enormous list of side effects that come with working out. Between the menthol providing a cooling effect, capsicum offering a warming property, and arnica giving relief from swelling and discomfort, it’s no wonder this product works so well. Add some full-spectrum tetrahydrocannabinol, cannabidiol, and almost 20 different essential oils into the mix, and your body is in for a serious treat. 

Applying an abundant amount to your source of pain will bring you instant relief, something that is hard to come by these days. After a long weekly routine at the gym, it is a comforting and rewarding feeling knowing that this groundbreaking product can help with recovery time and truly help my muscles feel better. 

Be sure to check out their other product lines, including their Sandalwood Healing Cream, Eucalyptus Orange Salve, Green Rub, and the trial kit they have available, which includes their three most popular products!

540.92mg THC

657.72mg CBD

This article was originally published in the September 2021 issue of Oregon Leaf.

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